Category Archives: Research

Cyprus Critical History Archive goes live!

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Lands of No Return lecture with Prof Roger Zetter (30 January)

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The NGO Support Centre (@ngo_centre) are working with the Association for Historical Dialogue and Research (@AHDRCY) on an open lecture entitled ‘Lands of No Return: population exchange and forced displacement in the 20th century’ next Wednesday 30 January, at 18:00, at the Home for Cooperation, in Nicosia.

The lecture will be given by Prof Roger Zetter, Emeritus Professor in Refugee Studies, University of Oxford, and will be followed by the screening of the ‘Twice a Stranger’ documentary.

Development in Theory, Development in Practice

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We told you they were busy!

Development seems to be all the buzz at the moment! The NGO Support Centre, in organising an open discussion on «Development in theory, Development in practice» to be held on Monday, 21 January, 18:00, at the European University of Cyprus, Room 203.

During the event two books will be presented, written within the framework of the «Knowledge Makes Change!» project.

The first book, «Development theory and Development in Practice: A Dialogue», was written by Dr. Alexander Apostolides and Mr. Stefano Moncada, and looks at the synergies emerging between, on the one hand, theoretical analysis, and the practical aspects of development on the other.

The second book is entitled «Working Together to Reach Our Goals», and was written by Mr. Marios Antoniou. The book aims at providing a basic understanding on the concept of international development, introducing the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and presenting the progress that has been made in achieving them.

Keep an eye out for more exciting development events and much, much more coming up next week!

Envisioning Education in Cyprus in the 21st Century

AHDR

CCMC member the Association for Historical Dialogue and Research (AHDR), working in collaboration with the Cyprus Academic Dialogue (CAD), are organising a policy dialogue discussion on ‘Education in Cyprus in the 21st Century’ on Thursday January 24, from 18.30 – 20.30 at the Home for Cooperation.

The discussion will focus on the following issues:

·         The role of Education in Cyprus, within the current socio- political situation and its possible contribution to the efforts towards a settlement of the political problem, and

·         How education could contribute to the sustainability of a future settlement?

The discussion will be held in Greek, Turkish and English and translation will be provided.

Th event will be the first installment of an exciting initiative involving key stakeholders from the main communities in Cyprus working collectively on a public consultation driven procedure, which will lead to the production of policy recommendations on education in Cyprus. The policy paper will be formulated using all key points raised in this series of events in order to articulate a collective vision on the future of Education in Cyprus in the 21st Century. Moreover, the policy paper will include recommendations on educational policies in the two main communities in Cyprus, both within the current political (pro-settlement) environment, as well as within a post-settlement political environment (irrespective of the content and the form of this political settlement).

The initiative is based on the AHDR’s comprehensive research project, exploring history teachers’ views of the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot history curricula and textbooks used across the existing divide in Cyprus, as well as history teachers’ use of methods that promote, historical thinking in their teaching.  You can download “History Educators in the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot Community in Cyprus: Perceptions, Beliefs and Practices” from the AHDR website.

For more information, please contact AHDR by e-mail ahdr.mide@gmail.com, or on the phone at +357-22-445740 or +90-548-8345740.

Mapping Community Media in Europe

CCMC has quite a few claims to fame, but if we are not mistaken the idea of mapping the Community Media landscape in Europe for the first time was born in Nicosia during the first annual CMFE Conference last November. The project aimed to create a complete picture of the European Community Media sphere so as to inform policy decisions for institutions such as the European Union and the Council of Europe.

A survey was created by the Community Media Forum Europe (CMFE) with the help of the European Platform of Regulatory Authorities (EPRA) and its members as well as some national federations, targeting 49 countries, with data now available for 39 of them.

According to the data collected by CMFE, “in January 2012 there were 2237 community radio stations and 521 community television stations in Europe. Most stations are located in EU member countries especially in France, Netherlands, Italy, United Kingdom, Denmark, Spain, Germany and Sweden. Only 122 radio and 9 television stations are located in countries outside the EU … In 17 countries (including four non-EU countries) the community media sector is regulated in the media law and as such this third media sector is recognized. In some European countries the community media sector is supported by government funding. Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands have substantial funding systems for both community radio and television. Belgium, Italy, Norway and Switzerland to a lesser extent. In France community radio is financed up to 40% by government funding.”

The next task for CMFE will be to rate each European country in order to enhance the development of community radio and community television in Europe, and we look forward to working with them on creating a more enabling environment for Community Media in Cyprus.

Have you written something on Cyprus in 2011?

Calling all researchers!

The forthcoming issue of The Cyprus Review journal (Vol. 24: No. 1) will include a bibliography section on all publications relating to Cyprus that came out in 2011. This would include new book titles, chapters in books, articles and PhDs. Conference proceedings, reports, documents, online and working papers can also be included.

The Cyprus Review team are finalising their list and you can help by bringing to their attention any publications you know of published last calendar year.

You can get hold of the current bibliography from Olga Demetriou at bookreviews.tcr@unic.ac.cy, or you can forward any material to Olga before the end of business tomorrow, Thursday 3rd May 2012.

A Potential Untapped: Media Working Together across the Divide in Cyprus

This article was first published on page 18 of today’s Cyprus Weekly (27 April).

In an increasingly globalised information environment, with the prevalence of multiple channels of communication, the media play a crucial role in encouraging or reducing the influence of conflict on societies. The ongoing Cyprus Problem places additional barriers to effective communication and information exchange between the island’s two main communities. The dominant narrative on the conflict has also had the effect of marginalising voices and opinions that speak of Cyprus in its entirety, as well as issues of relevance to all communities on the island.

The importance of bringing together media professionals in conflict and post-conflict areas has been recognised as a necessary step to promote a culture of trust and understanding between communities. Broadening people’s perspectives and opening them up to information and ideas is an important prerequisite to a fully functioning democratic media, as well as fair and accurate information dissemination within and between communities.

The Collaborative Media Initiative (CMI), implemented under the auspices of the Cyprus Community Media Centre (CCMC), has tried to look at the media landscape as one, bringing together a variety of approaches and documenting initiatives and best practice that all aim to bring two distinct systems of media governance closer together. Its final report, published this week, identifies a series of recommendations for action which fall broadly into three categories:

Creating a vision for an integrated media landscape in Cyprus

The Cypriot media landscape should include the creation of a multilingual and multicultural islandwide broadcaster. Steps can be taken now to fulfil this vision. The example of ARTE TV, established by France and Germany could be utilised as a model of best practice for creating media that can be shared following a period of conflict, and can also help to further integrate a reunited Cyprus with the rest of Europe. This could serve as a platform for common media institutions in a future Cyprus that will foster a sense of ownership amongst all Cypriots. Political will on behalf of decision makers is a key element to showing Cypriots that positive change can be achieved despite years of division.

Encourage media collaboration on a professional basis

Media professionals from both communities stand to benefit from working together. Collaborative work is taking place, but has remained under the radar due to its nature and delicacy in the current political situation. Journalists’ organisations, directors, and editors-in-chief should encourage their staff to work with colleagues from the other community and participate in events that concern all Cypriots. International organisations with an interest in supporting this process of integration, including the United Nations, the European Union and the Council of Europe, should also pay attention to work along parameters that encourage solid and sustainable partnerships.

Strengthening the links between media and democracy in Cyprus

Media is an essential element of a democratic society, where fair and accurate reporting can provide citizens with the necessary tools and access to information required to make informed decisions. For media to fulfil its role, conditions for media pluralism and freedom of expression must be established where a diversity of voices can enrich debate and accurately reflect all segments of the population. Improving the quality of access to media, and in particular new media through the internet, is crucial to strengthening levels of media literacy in Cyprus, and the capabilities of Cypriots to connect with each other. In this process, civil society will have an important role to play in creating a space for dialogue and cooperation. Organisations such as CCMC, with reach into all communities, can play an important and strategic role in this process.

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